News

Pollinators at Barr Lake State Park

In the fall of 2019, Pheasants Forever, Colorado Division of Wildlife and Barr Lake State Park, using a grant funded by Colorado Partners in the Outdoors, planted several plots of pollinators at Barr Lake State Park. These pictures are of some of the plants have gently cared for through the winter and are doing great! Note that there are butterflies in one of the pictures. In addition to the butterflies, honey bees, bumble bees, and other visitors have enjoyed the project. This is a great example of how partnerships create habitat for all of us!!

Please drop by Barr Lake visitors center and see the pollinators!!

Oil & Gas Hunt on February 28, 2020

On February 28, 2020, our chapter hosted a hunt for women in the Oil and Gas Industry in Colorado.  We are committed to creating a community of women dedicated to carrying on our upland traditions and the Pheasants Forever & Quail Forever mission. 

Follow this link to learn more about the Women on the Wing initiative.

Creating New Pheasant Habitat in the Wake of CRP Losses

Corners for Conservation

By Christina Schmidt

Just two years into the Corners for Conservation (C4C) program in northeast Colorado, Jerry Miller, a Pheasants Forever Farm Bill biologist, is hearing good things. He’s hearing from landowners pleased with the ease of sign up and the reliability of annual payments for their conservation efforts. He hears from hunters, excited about new hunting opportunities in previously inaccessible areas. But perhaps the most important feedback he receives is when he walks the enrolled fields and hears the calls of pheasants, bobwhites, meadowlarks, lark bunting and the busy hum of bees and pollinators.

“These acres are truly alive with all kinds of insects, birds, small animals and large animals like mule deer,” he said.

Corners for Conservation aka C4C

C4C began in 2016 when a team of representatives from Pheasants Forever and Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), alarmed by the loss of almost 50,000 acres of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) fields in four of Colorado’s top five pheasant counties, developed a partnership to address the habitat loss and increase hunter access.

The program works because of the geometric realities of farming on the high-desert plains. Land here is divided into 640-acre sections, and then further into 160-acre quarter sections that create a checkerboard pattern of corn, wheat, sugar beet and sunflower fields. While most crops are grown with natural precipitation, called dryland farming, some are watered by center-pivot irrigation systems which miss the outlying 7 to 8 acres in each corner of the square.

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